One Hidden Asset That Drives Your Company’s Value / by

posted in Blog tagged with asset, cash, cash flow, profit

You already know that your company’s revenue and profits play a big role in how much your business is worth. Did you also know the role that cash flow plays in your valuation and therefore the size of the check you can receive at closing?

Cash vs. Profits

Cash flow is different from profits in that it measures the cash coming in and out of your business rather than an accounting interpretation of your profit and loss. For example, if you charge $10,000 upfront for a service that takes you three months to deliver, you recognize $3,333 of revenue per month on your profit and loss statement for each of the three months it takes you to deliver the work.

But since you charged upfront, you get all $10,000 of cash on the day your customer decided to buy. This positive cash flow cycle improves your company’s valuation because when it comes time to sell your business, the buyer will have to write two checks: one to you, the owner, and a second to your company to fund its working capital – the cash your company needs to fund all immediate obligations like payroll, rent, etc.

The trick is that both checks are drawn from the buyer’s same bank account. Therefore, the less cash the acquirer has to inject into your business to fund its working capital, the more money it has to pay you for your company.

However, the inverse is also true.

If your company spends all its cash as it comes in (like living paycheck to paycheck), an acquirer will calculate that she needs to inject a lot of working capital into your business on closing day, which will deplete her resources and reduce the check she can write to you. Everything she has to put into working capital to continue the business, reduces the available cash that she could pay you and reduces your leverage to command a higher selling price.

How To Improve Your Cash Flow

There are many ways to improve your cash flow – and therefore, the value of your business. Here are just three simple ways you can try now.

 

  • Find a way to reduce the cash you spend on equipment, however you can every time. Can you buy used gear on sites like eBay? Can you share a very expensive piece of machinery with another non-competitive business? Can you rent it instead of buying?
  • Reassess your pricing. If you can’t accumulate cash reserves, check to see if you are underpricing your services or if your cost to price equation needs to be reviewed.
  • Streamline processes and productivity to keep payroll and services within budget allocations.

 

Profits are an important factor in your company’s value but so too is the cash your company generates.  We call this phenomenon The Valuation Teeter Totter and it is one of the key drivers of the value of your company. Curious to see how you’re performing on a whole set of value drivers? Get your private Sellability Score here.

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